Flying aircraft

Although the LAA isn’t directly involved in training people to fly from scratch (‘ab initio’ training), it’s a subject that is close to the heart of many members and potential members. Where the LAA does get actively involved is the continuing development of high standards of flying and airmanship in our members, via the Pilot Coaching Scheme.


Licences and learning to fly


Pilot licensing is a complex and ever-changing subject, but we will try and give a brief outline here.  Further information can be found via the links below.


Within the LAA fleet there are four classes of aircraft and each have different and/or overlapping licensing requirements.  Historically, these licences could be obtained from the UK CAA, the JAA or from other overseas agencies such as the US FAA.  More recently, EASA has launched a range of flight crew licences (FCL) that overlap or replace many of the historic licences, and are currently in a transition period. If you’re interested in learning to fly, your local flying school will be able to advise which licence is best for you, along with the relevant training requirements, requirements to keep the licence current and which can be used overseas.  In more complex situations, it might be best to contact the CAA’s Personnel Licensing Department. 

 

Class

Current ab initio training for:

May also be flown on:

Simple single engine aeroplanes (SSEA), historically known as ‘Group A’ aircraft

UK NPPL (A) with SSEA class rating
EASA LAPL(A)
EASA PPL(A)

UK PPL(A)
UK CPL(A)
UK ATPL(A)
EASA CPL(A)
EASA ATPL(A)

Microlight aircraft

(see note 5)

UK NPPL(A) with microlight class rating

UK PPL(A)
UK CPL(A)
UK ATPL(A)
EASA LAPL(A)
EASA PPL(A)
EASA CPL(A)
EASA ATPL(A)

Self launching motor gliders (SLMG)

UK NPPL(A) with SLMG class rating

UK PPL(A)
UK CPL(A)
UK ATPL(A)
EASA CPL(A)
EASA ATPL(A)

Gyroplanes

UK PPL(G)

UK CPL(G)

 

Notes:

  1. From 8 April 2015, only holders of EASA licences may only fly aircraft within the scope of the LAPL with EASA certificates of airworthiness  (CoA) or permits to fly (PtF).  From that date, holders of UK national licences may only fly aircraft with a UK CoA or PtF. For aircraft outside the scope of the LAPL, the transition date is 8 April 2014.
  2. The scope of the LAPL is "single-engine piston aeroplanes-land or touring motor glider (TMG) with maximum certificated take-off mass of 2000 kg or less, carrying a maximum of 3 passengers, such that there are never more than 4 persons on board of the aircraft".
  3. Medical requirements vary between the licences, with the UK NPPL having the most accessible requirements.
  4. Differences training is highly recommended when flying a new type or class of aircraft.
  5. A UK microlight aeroplane can be flown on an EASA licence if it has an SEP rating or privileges and differences training has been completed.

 

For further information:


LAA Pilot Coaching Scheme
TL 2.09 Learning to fly in a LAA Permit aircraft (pdf 36kb)
CAA CAP 804 Flight Crew Licensing (pdf 6Mb)
NPLG Ltd